Exercise and Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a painful condition in the joints of the hands, knees, hips and spine.  It affects millions of people throughout the world and is caused when the cartilage that cushions the joints wears down. There is no cure for this condition but there are some things you can do to strengthen your muscles around the joints. In turn, you may feel better overall.

It is important to consult your doctor before starting any exercise program. Your physician may have specific instructions for you to follow. These guidelines are important for helping to keep you safe. There are many different exercise programs that are safe for individuals with Osteoarthritis.

Locating a gym and setting goals

When looking for a gym choose one close to home, as it will be easier to go on a regular basis. You should also think about when you would like to workout. Individuals with arthritis usually feel better in the afternoon. Getting to the gym in the morning may be harder.

Water exercise

Water exercise is easy on the joints and may help with pain. Being in the pool will take weight off of your joints and make movement easier. When exercising in the water you can either have a trainer, take a class, or work on your own. If you choose to work on your own having an initial assessment and a training session is beneficial. Initial assessments and training sessions are usually included in a membership.  You should also ask which classes would be suitable for you.

Land Exercise

Individuals can benefit from land exercise as well. Some gyms have land arthritis classes or light classes. Again, having an assessment can help you to figure out which classes are right for you. Like water exercise you can choose to take a class, work on your own, or hire a trainer. Either way, talk to the fitness staff and ask for guidance.  On land, warm up is important. Try to do a 10 to 15 minute warm up on a recumbent bike. It will be easier for you to move after a proper warm up. It is also important not to run, jump, or lift too heavy.

Mind/Body Exercise

Mind/Body exercise is a nice compliment to any workout. It usually incorporates a balance and stress management component. There are many classes to choose from such as Yoga, Pilates, and Tai Chi. Most gyms today, have many variations of these classes. For instance, Gentle Yoga, and Chair Yoga are popular among individuals with arthritis. When searching for a gym ask what types of classes are offered.

 

Sources: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/arthritis/in-depth/arthritis/art-20047971?pg=1

Stress Management Institute for Health and Fitness Professionals

Robyn Caruso, B.A., CHES, smes, cpt

Robyn Caruso is the Founder of The Stress Management Institute for Health and Fitness Professionals™. She received her Bachelor’s Degree from Rowan University in Health Promotion and Fitness Management. She is an American Council on Exercise (ACE) personal trainer and group fitness instructor, a Certified Health Education Specialist by (NCHEC), and a Compassion Fatigue Resiliency and Recovery – Educator.
Robyn is an industry expert for the MedFit Network and MedFit Education Foundation Advisory Board Member, adjunct professor for Camden County College and Personal Training Advisory Board Member. Robyn is also a founding member of the Fitness Continuing Education Alliance (FCEA). She has taken the Mindfulness – Based Stress Reduction program (MBSR) through Jefferson University Hospital for Mindfulness. She has been in the fitness industry for 16 years in medical based fitness.
Robyn is the author of Stress Management Exercise Specialist 1st edition, Holistic Stress Management Specialist 1st edition and Holistic Stress Management Consultant 1st edition.

By working in the fitness industry, health and fitness professionals have the privilege of helping clients on a daily basis. When you take one of our specialty courses you are an important part of the healthcare continuum. On average 77% of individuals feel the physical, mental, and emotional symptoms of stress. Corporations spend approximately 3 billion a year on doctor visits and absenteeism.

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